Miami Medical flies off into the sunset

5 Jul

What a fitting and excellent finale Medicine Man proved to be. Written by Steve Maeda (the ‘quiet man’ of the Lieber/Maeda partnership), it gave all our actors something to chew on, and the audience lots to enjoy.

Two separate trauma incidents provided our patients, both rather less spectacular than in recent weeks (topping last week’s giant sinkhole was always going to be difficult). The first, a road accident, brings in Ben (John Bain) and his teacher Lori (Elizabeth Ho). Terrifyingly, Ben’s skull has become detached from his spine (Proctor describes him as being ‘internally decapitated’. Countrywide, Americans swooned at how he pronounces it) and in the course of examining him, a pre-existing and non-life-threatening  spinal cyst is discovered. Ben’s mother Dana (Betsy Brandt) has no health insurance and so the cyst has not been treated, but it will impact on Ben’s quality of life. Here’s what Jeffrey Lieber had to say about this aspect of the story when I spoke with him the other day:

The medical story of Medicine Man was inspired by an article we came across that said that people without health insurance were vastly more likely to die in a trauma incident than people with health insurance. It didn’t intellectually make sense – because trauma is about saving lives and damn the health insurance – until we realized that people without health care COME INTO a trauma event less healthy and therefore are in worse shape to start with.

Doing the right thing isn't easy

Eva Zambrano feels that, while Ben is under the knife, it makes perfect sense (which of course it does, surely?) to fix both the trauma injury and the cyst. But it seems that is not the way things are done, and Eva is left with a dilemma. The solution she chooses ends up being to her patient’s benefit but to her own detriment, and she gets a dressing-down from renowned (and formidable) surgeon Dr Sanaval (April Grace). It was pleasing to see a tv show tackle the very topical issue of health insurance (and the issues it raises for the considerable numbers of US citizens not in a position to afford it) in a sensitive way, and Lana Parrilla’s Eva was able to show us a little more of what her character could have gone on to become had the show not been cancelled. Serena’s praise of Eva as they both ate cake (presumably only microscopic crumbs: those girls do NOT look like serious cake-eaters!) left us in no doubt that Eva did the ‘right thing’.

Rick's surgery brings the brothers closer

Presumably, gorgeous Bailey Chase as Dr C’s naughty brother Rick and his kidney cancer storyline would have trickled on into series two. Those two are a great partnership. Seeing Rick press all of Chris’s buttons gave Mike Vogel an opportunity which he grabbed with both hands. As  far as it went, it resolved nicely with Rick reverting to type, but we’ll never know if he recovers or not.

Hat by Nurse Tuck, face by Jeremy Northam

I commented last week on how great it would be to see Jeremy Northam do some more comedy in the future and I got my wish sooner than I imagined!  Jeremy’s Proctor was treating the victim of  the second trauma incident. It really doesn’t matter what the incident was nor what his injuries were, all that matters is that Jesse (W. Earl Brown, Deadwood, in one of the best guest roles we’ve seen all series) refuses to be operated on unless Proctor and Tuck can produce a male Mallard duck and make a medicine hat from its feathers… And no, he’s not certifiable (Proctor tries that route) he just happens to hold a rather unusual set of beliefs about waterfowl! Proctor elects, finally, to go with the flow, and the interchanges between W. Earl Brown, Jeremy Northam, Omar Gooding and the duck they eventually source are an absolute delight, topped off by Proctor donning the medicine hat and announcing, with aplomb and obvious relish, ‘All hail the king of Quacksilvania!’ Jeremy really seemed to enjoy himself in this episode.

The duck, the quack and the possibly crackers...

When Jesse comes round after the operation, and presses Proctor to divulge what he believes in, Proctor takes him to his favourite part of the hospital (the roof, of course) and shows him the sunset. As the camera pans back, Proctor releases the duck and it flies away with all our dreams of a second season. It’s all very fitting that this is where it ends, back up on the roof with the sun setting (remember 88 Seconds?). But I’m still not happy about it…

A fitting and beautiful ending..

With thanks to Joan for the beautiful images of Proctor on the roof

by henrysmummy2003


15 Responses to “Miami Medical flies off into the sunset”

  1. Mary July 5, 2010 at 10:31 pm #

    Dear Gill, I have the episode now well understood because of language difficulties. Many thanks for that.
    It is very sad, that MM was discontinued, but we should be thankful we had thirteen weeks Jeremy Northam Festival

    • henrysmummy2003 July 5, 2010 at 10:34 pm #

      You’re quite right, we have been very lucky to have Jeremy every week, and we should be very grateful.

  2. katie July 5, 2010 at 11:18 pm #

    It was a GREAT episode, from start to finish. I liked the foreshadowing(literally!) with Ben drawing the duck.

    Trauma One must be right in the middle of things(the shrink who came to talk to Jesse made reference to the fact that there was a Chinese restaraunt nearby), and then in the end scenes with Jesse and Proctor on the hospital roof-that was great!)you could see a marina very close by.

    I’m an animal lover, so I “Awwwwwwwwwwwwwed” when Tuck showed up with Daffy. Proctor letting him go at the end of the episode was great, too.

    • henrysmummy2003 July 5, 2010 at 11:34 pm #

      Thanks Katie, it was great, wasn’t it? We’re told that, in an outtake, Jeremy kisses the duck!

  3. SueVo July 5, 2010 at 11:31 pm #

    Great recap Gill.
    “Countrywide, Americans swooned at how he pronounces it”
    hehe you know us well, don’t you? 😉

  4. Deb July 6, 2010 at 1:41 am #

    Thanks so much for this and other posts about Miami Medical. I can’t believe CBS can be so stupid, but then I’ve had a second opportunity to believe it with they’re firing Aj Cook from Criminal Minds and limiting Paget Brewster’s role in the same show. CBS seems bound and determined to ignore its audience. What a shame. Miami Medical is a good series and was getter better numbers. Gee, if CBS had given it a hair of suppport, who knows? But we never will now, sadly. Looking forwad to these actors having much success in their future projects. Chemistry of this show was waesome. Hope they release the DVD a least!

    • Deb July 6, 2010 at 1:43 am #

      Umm, that would be “awesome” LOL! 🙂

    • henrysmummy2003 July 6, 2010 at 7:43 am #

      Thanks Deb. Who knows what really goes on behind the scenes at CBS…but whatever it is, not a lot of it seems to involve taking note of its audience’s views…

  5. Jennythenipper July 9, 2010 at 9:45 pm #

    I thought he said, “internally decapitated” with just a little bit too much enthusiasm. You can tell the medical nerd in him is pretty jazzed up when new weird illnesses come into the unit.

    The picture with JN holding the duck is the most awesome thing ever. He was very funny this episode.

    • henrysmummy2003 July 12, 2010 at 7:49 am #

      He was very funny, I agree. As for ‘internally decapitated’, he did say it with relish! I always notice that Jeremy delivers his lines at about half the speed of the other actors. Don’t know whether this is deliberate to help Americans with his accent, or whether it’s just him, but it works anyway!

  6. Betty July 11, 2010 at 11:55 pm #

    Where can we sign up for Miami Medical to continue with the current cast. The show and cast were a refreshing medical show–not like the others, enjoyed the different ethnicities, the teaching techniques of the trauma team, the comraderie of the group. A well written show with seriousness, humanity, and humor.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Tweets that mention Miami Medical flies off into the sunset « The Jer Blog, all about Jeremy Northam -- Topsy.com - July 5, 2010

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Anthony Skordi, Gill Fraser Lee and others. Gill Fraser Lee said: The Jer Blog reviw of the fnal episode of @CBSMiamiMedical is now up…too sad! http://wp.me/pNnl7-bw […]

  2. Miami Medical flies off into the sunset (via The Jer Blog, all about Jeremy Northam) « Exploding Egg - July 5, 2010

    […] What a fitting and excellent finale Medicine Man proved to be. Written by Steve Maeda (the 'quiet man' of the Lieber/Maeda partnership), it gave all our actors something to chew on, and the audience lots to enjoy. Two separate trauma incidents provided our patients, both rather less spectacular than in recent weeks (topping last week's giant sinkhole was always going to be difficult). The first, a road accident, brings in Ben (John Bain) and his … Read More […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: